The Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay and the National Park Service are introducing a webinar series entitled, ‘Research of Jamaica Bay’.

Each month, we will feature two researchers whose work revolves around Jamaica Bay. This is an effort to coordinate and share scientific data, information, tools, and resources with our partners and networks working in Jamaica Bay and at other similar urban estuaries across the country and the world.

Schedule of Webinar Presentations

>>July 13, 2017; 12PM-1PM: Microbial Communities and Functionality of Jamaica Bay
Featuring Nathan Morris, CUNY: York College and Mary Alldred, CUNY: Baruch College.

Summary:
To be announced.

To attend, please register in advance at:

https://cornell.zoom.us/meeting/register/bbf99e3d0ce3ff9a34538d7d4481ef37 

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Please feel free to share this event!

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>>August 17, 2017; 12PM-1PM: TO BE Announced.

Summary:
To be announced

 

 

PAST WEBINAR PRESENTATIONS

>June 15, 2017; 12PM-1PM: Jamaica Bay Landscape Vegetation Assessment
Featuring  Helen Forgione, Natural Areas Conservancy (NAC), and  Steven Handel, Rutgers University.

Summary:
Vegetation is crucial to the health of Jamaica Bay; it cleans and cools our air, it provides habitat for wildlife, and it helps lessen erosion.
There is ongoing work to assess the types of vegetation that exist in the coastal areas of Jamaica Bay. Research has helped to identify the most vulnerable areas and also suggest ways of maintaining the vegetative fringe areas during the decades ahead.
Through surveys and assessments as well as experimentation and monitoring, Helen Forgione and  Steven Handel give their insights to the landscape vegetation assessment and work they and their teams have been doing in Jamaica Bay as well as prospects going into the future. 

View Recording of Webinar Presentation

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>May 18, 2017; 12PM-1PM: Jamaica Bay Historical Ecology and Change
Featuring Dr. Eric Sanderson, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) ; Dr. John Waldman, City University of New York (CUNY): Queens College.

Summary:
Despite being situated in the intensely urbanized, highly populated city of New York, Jamaica Bay and its watershed have received only minimal historical attention. Recently, there has been work to assess its history and its ecology throughout the years. Through in-depth analyses of archived newspapers, old maps, historical descriptions, and geographic modelling, Dr. John Waldman and Dr. Eric Sanderson provide an interesting overview of Jamaica Bay’s historical change and ecology, how its past influenced its present conditions, and finally, its prospects going into the future.
Dr. John Waldman will provide a brief overview of what we found about the environment of Jamaica Bay in our survey of regional newspapers from about 1840-1910.
Dr. Eric Sanderson will discuss his findings about the historical dynamics of Jamaica Bay’s ecology from old maps, historical descriptions, and geographic modelling.  He will briefly discuss the relevance of this work on the historical geomorphology and ecology for how we envision the ecology of Jamaica Bay in the future.

View Recording of Webinar Presentation

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>>April 20, 2017; 12PM-1PM: Jamaica Bay Water Quality Data Visualization and Access Tool.
Featuring Dr. Sandra Baptista, Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) at Columbia University ; Dr. Brett Branco, City University of New York (CUNY): Brooklyn College.

Summary:
The Jamaica Bay Water Quality Database is an interactive Web application for Jamaica Bay, New York created by the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) and Brooklyn College. Data were provided by Gateway National Recreation Area (Gateway) of the National Park Service (NPS) and the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP). The datasets were then formatted to ensure compatibility of measurement units and facilitate integration into a single database. The purpose of this database is to centralize access to water quality data in support of research, management and education that promote resilience in Jamaica Bay and the surrounding communities. The project team is identifying other water quality datasets that may be integrated into the database in the future, and planning additional information layers that contribute to understanding patterns and changes in water quality.

View Recording of Webinar Presentation

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